Episode 185: Hobo Greg – Crossing the Threshold.

On Episode 185 of the Enormocast, I am joined in Carbondale by a mythical figure named Hobo Greg. Who is Hobo Greg? I don’t know, even now. He left his home in New Jersey on a Greyhound bus four years ago and is now a climbing guide in Joshua Tree. He drinks wine by the light of the moon. He rambles up 5.7 trad. He wears out the ass of his Carharts. Somewhere in there, he lost his father. And its all added up to a man living free and relishing his life in the climbing community. Listen and learn how to simplify and, to paraphrase Joseph Campbell, “Let go of the life you have planned and accept the life you have waiting for you.”

Hobo Greg Online

Hobo Greg at the Climbing Zine.

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Episode 184: Corey Rich – The Story is the Thing

On Episode 184, I sit down with climber and photographer, Corey Rich. Corey came up as a dirtbag climber, but he simultaneously started a serious study of photography and how to use a camera. A fateful roadtrip put his images in front of the main climbing media outlets of the day like Climbing Magazine and the Patagonia Catalog, and soon, Corey’s photographs were appearing in climbing publications worldwide. Corey never looked back. He has since become one of the most accomplished action and bigwall photographers in the game. Quite literally, Corey and his camera have shaped what modern climbers see when they think about climbing.

Corey’s New Book: Stories Behind the Images

Coreyrich.com

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Episode 183: Jim Donini – Once More Unto the Breach, Dear Friends.

On Episode 183 of the Enormocast, I sit down with truly legendary alpinist, Jim Donini. Jim has been banging it out on big climbs since before most of you, dear listeners, were born. Jim cemented his reputation early on in Patagonia when it was still a truly wild frontier, but Donini went on to put up first ascents on all 7 continents. His career also depicts a long love affair with the Karakorum and Alaska. But for Jim, the quality of the person at the other end of his rope is far more important than the climbing objective, and Jim has passed through thick and thin with many of the greats. 55 years and not stopping yet, Jim Donini is barometer for what’s possible in climbing longevity.

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